Command line

CMDer/ConEmu – starting new tab in current folder

Recently I posted about a trick allowing the user to open new CMDer/ConEmu tab in current folder from command line. In response ConEmu team twitted a better solution that I would like to share:
 
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Command line

CMDer/ConEmu – starting new tab in current folder from command line

Quite frequently I found myself opening several console tabs in the same folder (for vim, for running unit tests, for git, for executing the application etc). Starting new tab and navigating to my project’s directory is not optimal so I created a short !cmd.bat snippet that I can run everywhere (added as global alias) and it will create a new tab for me in the same directory. Here’s the content:

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Own projects

DSP2017 – What’s your methodology?

Almost three weeks have passed since the start of DSP2017. I cannot say that I feel excited about what I did. Nothing really changed since the last year (which was unsuccessful). Maybe it’s time for a quick recap? Maybe the way I drive my project after-hours is less serious than then one I do at work? Why? Wiseman said: Pay yourself first.

Maybe the thing is that I miss some kind of a process, rules to proceed, methodology? Why not to take the best of what I do and practice at work?

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Command line, Programming (back-end)

Using several dotnet CLI versions and why you should care

Frankly speaking “several” keyword in the title is an overuse, because while writing this article I’m thinking only about two versions of dotnet CLI. Why? Because RC4 version dropped support to project.json and switched completely to the new *.csproj format. On one hand it’s good – let’s follow the hype, cool to have tooling already. On the other hand if you still maintain/develop solution based on project.json then you have a problem (you will not be able to use dotnet CLI with that).

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Command line, Programming (back-end)

Getting started with dotnet CLI

Dotnet CLI is a command line interface used for working with .NET projects. It’s not something new in .NET world. It was established in 2015. Back then there was another try with DNX in 2013 – not very successful.

Why to bother CLI?

You do not need CLI if you work with .NET code only from perspective of Visual Studio. CLI is really needed if you want to setup build pipeline, because build agent does not have to have Visual Studio installed. But let’s not forget about .NET migrating from Windows to the world. From now on you can run it everywhere (far far away there are systems without *.exe files) and build it with notepad, VIM or emacs. And that’s when dotnet CLI comes in.

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