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Why am I moving from Visual Studio to VIM?

As I mentioned in my previous post I want to use VIM instead of Visual Studio to work on my logcmd project. This would be a kind of an experiment, but I do have some fair reasons behind that decision. Why do I think VIM is a good alternative to Visual Studio?

It encourages automation

If you’ve ever worked in VIM, you know, that the most important & personal thing is _vimrc file. It’s not that all the keybindings and plugins are already there. You have to create them, customize, sometimes create scripts that boosts your development, and you do it all the time. The other things you need to run directly from console. And obviously you do not retype all the kilobytes of commands all the time. After the second try you want to automate it and have a script that works for you. Although it may sound prehistoric to some of you, it has a lot of long-term benefits. You don’t have to teach new people (or even your future “you”) how to validate JavaScript, do merging/branching, compile LESS, deploy to DEV server, upgrade release notes etc. This way you also get stronger in command line scripting.

It cures bad habits of debugging

All the people praise VS for astonishing debuggig features. It’s all true, but I think overused almost all the time. I know it allows to solve the most hardcore and unexpected behaviour that you could imagine, but on the other hand it’s like using excel for simple arithmetic. I experienced it on my own. Do you remeber one of the following:

  • running the application to check some business logic (writing unit test would take too much time (sic!))
  • fixing some hard issue after hours of debugging and forget how to debug again
  • wishing you could debug your application on PROD?

This all is because of relying on Visual Studio “debugger”. Other people not so tightly coupled with debugger invented better approach decades ago. It’s LOGGING. I’m always amazed how people solve their problems with RaspberryPi or Linux problems on discussion boards – it’s always clear after sending the logfile. Having a good habit of logging also works on “debugging” production.

It has better performace

It’s all about automation and the keyboard. Have you ever seen a hacking movie where they open “My computer -> My documents -> my hacking -> Visual Hacking studio -> create new project”? Or drag and drop viruses from “My downloads”. It’s because mouse is slower than keyboard (unless you participate in Quake 3 Arena world championship). Of course it’s slower if you started with mouse, but give it some time. You can self-check how much faster it is to use vim’s “ci(” instead of searching the starting parenthesis, selecting the text with mouse, finding the closing parenthesis and pressing BACKSPACE.
It’s also a better performance of the editor itself. Visual Studio is slow, but how can an application that takes a couple of GB on disk be fast all the time? On the contrary VIM is pretty leighweigh and blazing fast (unless you install everything you find on Github).

It’s more universal

VIM is everywhere, not only C, C++, C#, Java, JavaScript, Go, Haskel and friends. And VIM is there for years (VI released in 1976). It’s important if you hesitate about the future of Microsoft, or feel bored of .NET (or burnt).

It has the spark of extravagance

Have you seen Rob Ashton coding? Have you seen other people’s faces during that? But, that’s mixture of freak and performance.

It’s raw in a positive way

You think programming is not only about writing the code fast? It’s mainly about reading, right? Then even better, because VIM is raw. There are no codelens, different toolbars/toolboxes, variety of windows, resharper rainbow of tips and tricks. You can focus on code only.

Changing your environment is good

It opens up your mind, it’s like being polyglot programmer. In case of programming languages, if you knew C# only, you would solve each and every problem using classes. Same with environment/IDE. It’s obvious for us that using Visual Studio debugger we can set the next statement there and back. I believe other environments also has such obvious things that we are not aware of.

In the end I’d like to share some video of VIM coding in action.

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One thought on “Why am I moving from Visual Studio to VIM?

  1. Good Luck 🙂
    I have been using vim for 4 years. Sadly couldnt get away from Visual Studio for C#. My compromise is VsVim extension.

    As for vim recent work in JS space with React showed me for the first time that investment in vim was worthwhile.

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